Landscaping

June 26th, 2012

Lately I’ve been driving around the country side enjoying the sights and observing those farms located close enough to the road to get a drive by glimpse into their yards.  Sometimes I wonder if a person’s yard or landscaping gives us a look into their personality.  You have those places overrun with weeds or equipment, with buildings falling down and lawn unattended.  Then there are the places in-between, maybe they have mowed the lawn but haven’t trimmed up the edges or there are a few piece of equipment stashed in the tall grass.  And then there are the places with not a piece out of place, neat as can be.  Truth be told those are the places I imagine my farm should or could look like, but alas I’m not there yet.  Unlike my sister who absolutely loves mowing the lawn, I don’t find it to be the best use of my time or resources.  Of course it could be that I feel this way because all I have is a little push mower to mow my extensive country lawn.  Or maybe it’s because I dream about the completed lawn and how it would look but just can’t stomach the around and around for hours on end enough to actually get there.  Unfortunately I cannot deny how beautiful it looks on those occasions when I do complete my lawn work, and so that spurs me forward and someday soon, maybe not quite this year, but soon I will join my fellow country kin who have that perfectly kept homestead.

Landscaping is more than just lawn though, in fact as the years continue to build up I see a lawn that is replaced by flowering prairie plants or bushes and trees.  This spring I have come to realize I need more flowering plants.  Spring is filled with Lilac, crab apple blossoms, tulips, daffodils and other flowering bulbs that lead into the Peonies and Tiger Lilies but then I have a lull in flowers that needs fixing.  Last year I planted Zinnias along my driveway in July and was blessed with a colorful bed of flowers along Haucke Lane for at least a month.  I will do that again this season and build on that season after season until I find myself and old man and can say as J Sterling Morton stated in closing his Washington Arbor Day address of 1894 said “So every man, woman, and child who plants trees shall be able to say on coming as I come, toward the evening of life, in all sincerity and truth, ‘If you seek my monument, look around you!’”

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